Social Security Disability Benefits for Mental Conditions Archives

Social security disease: What's a neurocognitive disorder?

According to the United States Social Security Administration, in order for individuals to receive permanent disability benefits, they must have a disabling condition. Certain disabling conditions are already codified and classified by the SSA in a long list of qualifying diseases. The classification "cognitive disorders," for example, has been defined by the SSA for this purpose.

Mental illness and Social Security disability benefits

Social Security, the U.S. federal government's safety net for personal support, contains several options for Americans who need or additional income. Although the most common and familiar form of benefit is for retired or aging Americans, people suffering long-term disabilities that prevent them from working, including those diagnosed with mental disorders, are also eligible from Social Security benefits and related aid.

Claiming benefits for mental health disabilities

Suffering from mental health disorders is very common and is nothing to be ashamed of. It is important to seek help if you think that you may be suffering from a mental health condition, and in this case you may also qualify for disability benefits from the Social Security Administration (SSA). This blog gives an overview of what types of benefits the SSA offers and which types of mental disabilities are covered.

Do factitious disorders disqualify you from drawing benefits?

A factitious disorder is a condition where patients consciously and deliberately act as though they have an actual mental or physical illness, but they really do not. At face value, it would seem that would disqualify them from drawing Social Security benefits. But it is a bit more complicated than that.

SSD for claims of mental impairment

Social Security Disability claims depend on evidence. This makes some claims easier to to be approved. For instance, an individual suffering from heart disease may have a well-documented medical record, complete with tests, treatments and other evidence detailing the observable physical toll the disease has taken on the individual's heart.

Social Security claims for mental disorders

One of the most difficult types of Social Security disability claims is that of a mental impairment. Medicine in the U.S. is materialistic, in that physical ailments and diseases or conditions that create physical evidence are typically considered more "real" than mental or psychological impairments.

Study: Postpartum anxiety affecting more women than expected

Work and anxiety disorders don't fit together too well for most people. People who experience anxiety or anxiety-related conditions often find that they cannot continue working until and unless they can effectively treat their symptoms, which is why many people apply for disability benefits when they cannot work.

Too young to develop Alzheimer's disease?

With early-onset Alzheimer's disease, it difficult to know which would be worse. Not knowing what is wrong and spend months or years dealing with doctors in an effort to find out why you no longer can remember important tasks or dates, or to be told years in advance that you are likely to develop the disease.

Researchers claim that seasonal affective disorder doesn't exist

Depression can happen for several reasons. Some patients may have a genetic predisposition, while other cases are triggered by trauma or other negative life events. Patients may live with a range of symptoms, from chronic sadness, hopelessness or anxiety to sleep disorders, pain and lack of energy.

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