If there’s one thing that we should keep in mind about November’s mid-term election, it’s that voters from both parties seem to want to see Medicare, Social Security (SS) and Medicaid hang around for many years to come.

A spokesperson for Freedom Works, a conservative nonprofit group, notes that before the election, many Republicans in Missouri and across other states had campaigned on the promise of cutting spending on these social programs. Many of them said that they wanted to do so in order to whittle away at the federal debt.

When it came time to hit the polls, however, many voters decided to keep representatives in office that were all for continuing funneling billions of dollars into keeping these programs alive each year.

One Republican incumbent from Utah had campaigned against cuts to SS on the grounds that making any changes to it the system would put lives at stake.

A Maine Democrat fought against a rollback or privatization of both Medicare and SS. He said that it would affect seniors’ ability to live both comfortable and secure retirements.

Another Virginia representative referred to the continuance of Medicare and SS as critical to the United States government being able to meet its obligation to its seniors. A Colorado Democrat echoed some of those same sentiments.

Many consider these federal programs to be flawed because they feel that they only provide minimal health and financial benefits to the poor, disabled or elderly. Others point to their longevity as a sign that they’re what many retirees and working families need. If you’re wondering what’s considered a severe impairment, an attorney can advise you of whether the condition that you have is one.