A musculoskeletal condition that your doctors may classify as disabling may not be viewed the same way by the Social Security Administration (SSA).

It helps if your condition is included on SSA’s Listing of Impairments (although that isn’t always essential). Your condition should be expected to last at least 12 months and be so crippling that it renders you unable to work any type of job, sedentary or otherwise.

Musculoskeletal conditions acquired through a pathologic process may make you eligible to receive SSD. Those contracted through congenital or hereditary means may also qualify. Those caused by metabolic/toxic, neoplastic or vascular diseases may also make you eligible to receive benefits.

Any impairment that is brought about by a developmental process, by trauma, through an infection, through a degenerative process or as an inflammatory response may also qualify you to receive benefits.

If the condition that you’re suffering from has left you with a loss of function, then you may also qualify to receive SSD. This may have been caused by some kind of amputation or joint destruction or deformity. A disability may have also been brought about by some type of neurological deficit, a soft tissue injury, radiculopathy, burns and fractures.

Any individual that can demonstrate that their musculoskeletal impairment causes them pain and affects their use of gross motor skills may also qualify for SSD. This is especially the case if their condition makes it hard for them to get around consistently.

Many Missouri residents who apply for SSD are unsuccessful in their pursuit of benefits on their first try. Their applications don’t get approved because they fail to show that their condition prevents them from doing any type of work.

A Social Security Disability Benefits attorney can help you document your injury or impairment so that your application has a higher chance of being approved on the first attempt.