Can’t work because of a disability? Call us Toll-Free at 📞 1-877-213-7793 or Locally at 📞 314-231-6660
No initial fees and no fees until your claim is approved.

What is a failure to thrive?

On Behalf of | Jun 10, 2021 | Social Security Disability

As the parent of a child with a disability, you understand how taxing it is. Not only does it impact the life of your child, but it can create massive amounts of stress and pressure on parents like you, too.

Parents like you in such a difficult situation likely fear for your ability to rely on Social Security Disability benefits. SSD benefits often rely on the notion that your child cannot work, which they may still be able to. But fortunately, there is still a way to ensure you get the benefits you need to survive.

Impairments that impact ability to thrive

Social Security lists impairments that impact your child’s ability to thrive. These benefits fall under the SSDI category of parents providing for children. In other words, you can receive benefits to help support their care. Often, you have access to these benefits as soon as necessary, which can even be as early as the birth of your child. Failure to thrive is one of the most common categories that allow for even newborns to be applicable.

What are the qualifying conditions?

However, you naturally still need to fit the qualifying conditions. Failure to thrive must involve your child’s failure in the SSA’s list of impairments. This can include issues with weight. A child must fall in the bottom third percentile in their weight-for-length measurements. This must happen at least three times, with each measurement occurring at least 60 days apart from the last. They also need to experience at least one consistent developmental delay. This delay places them in the lower two-thirds of their age. They can also qualify through two separate delays at least 120 days apart.

If your child fits these categories, consider looking further into the possibility of seeking benefits.